Lithium Car Battery

The lithium ion car battery is the hope for our and future generations to reduce carbon emissions and foreign oil dependency. Lithium ion car batteries were designed for use in plug in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and two much-anticipated PHEV models will be released at the end of this year: the Chevy Volt and the Nissan Leaf. While environmentalists and car critics await the release of these PHEVs, scientists and consumers continue to study the true effects of the lithium ion car battery, and a 2008 study in Environmental Science and Technology Journal points out that the US electric infrastructure may not aid lithium ion car batteries in reducing carbon emissions. The study highlighted that US power plans for coal-fired plants will lead to a carbon intensive energy portfolio; the study estimates that a carbon intensive portfolio will cause 950g of carbon dioxide per kWh, and the Nissan Leaf lithium ion battery uses 24 kWh per charge, meaning that the Leaf will cause almost twenty-three thousand grams of carbon dioxide emissions.

The study highlighted that US power plans for coal-fired plants will lead to a carbon intensive energy portfolio; the study estimates that a carbon intensive portfolio will cause 950g of carbon dioxide per kWh, and the Nissan Leaf lithium ion battery uses 24 kWh per charge, meaning that the Leaf will cause almost twenty-three thousand grams of carbon dioxide emissions. The lithium car battery for the Nissan Leaf is estimated to give 100 miles of driving per charge; emissions for the PHEV are estimated at 50lbs of CO2 per charge. In comparison, the EPA states that each gallon of gasoline releases 19.4 pounds of Carbon Dioxide into the air. A fuel-efficient vehicle like the 2010 Ford Fiesta, which boasts 40 mpg, will drive 100 miles on 2.5 gallons of gasoline, and emit 48.5lbs of carbon dioxide Of course, lithium-ion car batteries reduce our dependency on foreign oil, and almost remove air pollution and smog caused by transport in cities, but the report concludes that if demand for plug in hybrid electric vehicles and the lithium car battery continues to grow, the US energy portfolio will need to incorporate less carbon intensive energy sources such as solar, wind, and nuclear power in order to be effective at reducing carbon emissions.

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A fuel-efficient vehicle like the 2010 Ford Fiesta, which boasts 40 mpg, will drive 100 miles on 2.5 gallons of gasoline, and emit 48.5lbs of carbon dioxide Of course, lithium-ion car batteries reduce our dependency on foreign oil, and almost remove air pollution and smog caused by transport in cities, but the report concludes that if demand for plug in hybrid electric vehicles and the lithium car battery continues to grow, the US energy portfolio will need to incorporate less carbon intensive energy sources such as solar, wind, and nuclear power in order to be effective at reducing carbon emissions.